Pragmatism as Principle: Hybrid Courts

The Comeback of Hybrid Courts - PRIF Report by Lisbeth Zimmermann

The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Photo: flickr, Courtesy of Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, https://bit.ly/2J131et, CC BY 2.0)

The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Photo: flickr, Courtesy of Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, https://bit.ly/2J131et, CC BY 2.0)

At the turn of this cen­tury, a number of hybrid courts were es­tab­lished to pro­se­cute the most severe crimes com­mit­ted in war­ring and post-conflict societies. It was hoped that the de­cisions would be viewed as more le­git­imate and the courts could be more ef­ficient through local in­te­gration rather than the use of purely inter­nat­ional criminal courts. How­ever, inter­fe­rence by local elites, re­cur­rent fun­ding short­falls and a lack of owner­ship by inter­nat­ional actors quickly cooled en­thu­siasm for hybrid criminal pro­se­cution. Since 2013, how­ever, a new gen­eration of hybrid in­sti­tutions has been es­tab­lished.

In PRIF Report No. 150 "Pragmatism as Principle. The Comeback of Hybrid Courts" Lisbeth Zimmermann looks at what has been learned from the mis­takes of the first gen­eration, and what sig­ni­fi­cance hybrid courts could have in the future.

Download (245kb): Zimmermann, Lisbeth (2017): Pragmatism as Principle. The Comeback of Hybrid Courts, PRIF Report No. 150, Frankfurt/M.

The German version of the report: Download (261kb): Zimmermann, Lisbeth (2017): Prinzip Pragmatismus: Das Comeback der hybriden Gerichte, HSFK-Report Nr. 6/2017, Frankfurt/M.