Global Crime Governance – Towards a Normative Order to Combat Transnational Non-state Violence and Organized Crime


Since the end of the Cold War, the rise of non-state violence has become a new challenge for governance in the international arena. Transnational organized crime – as in form of trafficking drugs, arms or humans – and politically motivated rebel groups are, at the same time, endangering the state’s monopoly over the use of force.

Ways of international cooperation for combating crimes

This study, carried out from 2010 to 2012, focused on the various forms of global crime governance that emerge in response to these phenomena. It investigated the forms, causes and effectiveness of international cooperation in combating crime and dealing with political forms of non-state violence by rebels or terrorist groups. The project was particularly interested in the changing role of non-state economic and civil society actors in the context of global crime governance.
A comparative study of different regulatory approaches investigated the extent to which and under which conditions the inclusion of non-state actors increases the effectiveness of global crime governance.


Survey, causal mechanisms, analysis and recommendations

Assuming that conflicts over recognition and procedural or distributive justice could be the causes of transnational crime and non-state violence, strategies based on securitization and criminalization alone will not prove to be effective responses. Rather, global crime governance is in need of a normative reconfiguration in regard to the substance of regulations as well as the status ascribed to non-state criminal or violent actors – these may range from criminal organizations to “co-producers” of peace-promoting governance.

The study proceeds in four steps: first, it maps the existing international approaches to combating crime and non-state violence in various areas (piracy, human smuggling and trafficking, money laundering and corruption, illegal arms trade, and terrorism). Second, it identifies the causal mechanisms that explain why certain institutional designs prevail over other possibilities. Third, an impact analysis assesses and explains the effectiveness of global crime governance by evaluating both their immediate effects for problem resolution and their impacts on cross-sectoral peace and justice. Based on these findings, the project generates policy recommendations that enable for the development of appropriate measures to deal with transnational non-state violence and organized crime. These also provide answers to questions such as: How many and what kind of police and military measures are necessary? To what degree and under which conditions are inclusion and recognition necessary and feasible?

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1
Non-state Actors in Transnational Criminal Law | 2013

Annegret Flohr, Non-state actors in transnational criminal law, in: Anja P. Jakobi/Klaus Dieter Wolf (Hg.), The Transnational Governance of Violence and Crime. Non-State Actors in Security, Basingstoke (Palgrave), 2013.

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Facing Violence and Crime | 2013

Anja P. Jakobi/Klaus Dieter Wolf, Facing Violence and Crime: Models of Non-State Actor Involvement in Governance, in: Anja P. Jakobi/Klaus Dieter Wolf (Hg.), The Transnational Governance of Violence and Crime. Non-State Actors in Security, New York (Macmillan), 2013, S. 257-272.

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Constraining the Conduct of Non-State Armed Groups | 2013

Stefanie Herr, Constraining the Conduct of Non-State Armed Groups, in: Anja P. Jakobi/Klaus Dieter Wolf (Hg.), The Transnational Governance of Violence and Crime. Non-State Actors in Security, New York (Macmillan), 2013, S. 40-60.

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The Transnational Governance of Violence and Crime | 2013

Anja P. Jakobi/Klaus Dieter Wolf (eds.), The Transnational Governance of Violence and Crime. Non State Actors in Security, New York (Macmillan), 2013.

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Trafficking, Human; Criminal Networks | 2012

Anja P. Jakobi, Trafficking, Human; Criminal Networks, in: G. Ritzer (Hg.), Blackwell Encyclopedia of Globalization. Blackwell (im Druck).

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The FATF as the central promoter of the anti-money laundering regime | 2012

Anja P. Jakobi, The FATF as the central promoter of the anti-money laundering regime, in: M. Bergström/K. Svedberg Helgesson/U. Mörth (Hg.), Securitization, Accountability and Risk Management. Transforming the Public Security Domain, London (Routledge), im Erscheinen.

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Common Goods and Evils? | 2011

Anja P. Jakobi, Common Goods and Evils? The Formation of Global Crime Governance. Habilitationsschrift, Fachbereich Gesellschafts- und Geschichtswissenschaften, TU Darmstadt, 2011.

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OECD Activities against Money Laundering and Corruption | 2010

Anja P. Jakobi, OECD Activities against Money Laundering and Corruption, in: Kerstin Martens/Anja P. Jakobi (Hg.), Mechanisms of OECD Governance. International Incentives for National Policy-Making?, Oxford (Oxford University Press), 2010, S. 139-160.

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9
Piraterie vor Somalia | 2009

Melanie Zimmer, Piraterie vor Somalia. Staatsverfall, Kriegsökonomie und die internationale Gemeinschaft, HSFK-Standpunkte, Nr. 6/2009, Frankfurt/M.

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